Overview of the New York City Fiscal Year 2025 Preliminary Budget


Budget Analysis & Priorities

February 6, 2024

On January 16th, 2024, Mayor Adams released a $109.4 billion Preliminary Budget for City Fiscal Year 2025. The City Preliminary’s Budget includes $8.2 billion in reserves as well as $1.67 billion in Program to Eliminate the Gap (PEG) funding cuts in Fiscal Year 2025. The $1.67 billion in FY25 PEG cuts in the Preliminary Budget are in addition to 5% cuts across city agencies that occurred in the Mayor’s November Budget Modification.

The Administration has recently revised its budget projections, lowering expected city expenses and raising expected revenue. As a result of these revised budget projects, the Mayor has reversed course on some programming cuts in the Preliminary Budget by partially restoring cuts to areas including Community Schools, Summer Rising, and Libraries. However, widespread and extensive cuts remain across city agencies, and their harm to the ability of New York families to access services is difficult to overstate. Among these cuts are over $221 million in city funding cut from the early care and education system. These cuts would occur in tandem with prior year cuts that have already stalled the expansion of 3-K and are now triggering the elimination of existing and budgeted system seats. Cuts in the November Budget Modification also included $19.6 million from the Summer Rising and $6.9 million from the COMPASS afterschool program. The cuts in COMPASS funding will result in an estimated loss of over 3,000 seats for youth, and providers are reporting their programs are being cut even though they have waitlists to access them.

The city administration’s actions will decimate access to services essential to child and youth development and wellbeing, school readiness and success, parental workforce attachment, and the City’s economic recovery. We must also acknowledge that austerity now results in future generations denied the basic resources and community supports they need to grow, develop, and become healthy and thriving adults.

CCC believes priority must be given to reversing course on proposed cuts and to instead making enhanced investments in key areas. These areas include expanding access to child care,  3-K and Prek; protecting against system capacity reductions to Early Care and Education and youth services while filling seats and facilitating youth engagement; increasing funding for anti-hunger and anti-poverty programs; enhancing behavioral health supports in schools and communities; addressing the needs of asylum seekers; and preventing family homelessness, investing in shelter supports, and expediting access to permanent affordable housing through vouchers.

Summary of Actions Taken in the New York FY2025 Preliminary Budget

The FY24 November Budget Modification Reduces Funding for the Following Initiatives in FY25:

These reductions are recognized in the Preliminary Budget documents

  • $120 million in FY25 and outyears for ECE Efficiencies (DOE)
  • $8 million FY25 and outyears for Community Schools (DOE)
  • $60 million in FY25 and outyears for School Food Savings (DOE)
  • $1.5 million in FY25 and outyears for the New York Research Library (NYPL)
  • $8 million in FY25 and outyears for the New York Public Library (NYPL)
  • $6 million in FY25 and outyears for the Brooklyn Public Library (BKPL)
  • $6.3 million in FY25 and outyears for the Queens Public Library (QPL)
  • $1 million in FY25 and outyears for the Arches Program (Probation)
  • $2.6 million in FY25 and outyears for Next Step program efficiencies (Probation)
  • $310,00 in FY25 and outyears for Close to Home Monitoring (ACS)
  • $6.7 million in FY25 and outyears for Close to Home Re-Estimate (ACS)
  • $5.1 million in FY25, and $5.4 million in outyears for Committee on Special Education/Special Education Re-estimate (ACS)
  • $400,000 in FY25 and outyears for Early Learn (ACS)
  • $555,000 in FY25 and outyears for Family Service Unit Reorganization (ACS)
  • $1.6 million in FY25 and outyears for Preventive Re-estimate (ACS)
  • $2 million in FY25 and outyears for RTA Programming & IT (ACS)
  • $6.7 million in FY25 and $8.9 million in outyears for Alternatives to Incarceration Re-Estimate (OCJ)
  • $8 million in FY25 and $5 million in outyears for Re-Entry Services Re-Estimate (OCJ)
  • $13 million in FY25 and $5.4 million in outyears for Supervised Release Re-Estimate (OCJ)
  • $19.6 million in FY25 and outyears for Summer Rising (DYCD)
  • $6.9. million in FY25 and outyears for COMPASS Afterschool (DYCD)
  • $5.4 million in FY 25 and outyears for Office of Neighborhood Safety (DYCD)
  • $1 million in FY25 and outyears for Unallocated Funding, including Advance and Earn Expansion, Summer Youth Employment Program Metrocards, Precision Employment Initiative, and Readi Initiative (DYCD)

The Preliminary Budget for FY 2025 Reduces Funding for the Following Initiatives:

  • $50 million in FY25 and outyears for Early Childhood Efficiencies (DOE)
  • $51.7 million in FY25 and $60.8 million in outyears for ECE Other than Personnel Services (OTPS) efficiencies (DOE)
  • $9.5 million in FY25 and outyears for Child Care Claiming (ACS)
  • $555,000 in FY25 and outyears for the Family Service Unit (ACS)
  • $760,000 in FY25, $1.52 million in FY26, $2.28 million in FY27, and $3.04 million in FY28 for Preventive Re-Estimate (ACS)
  • $16.5 million in FY25 and $20.0 million in outyears for Rental Assistance Program Upgrades (DSS)
  • $78.93 million in FY25 in DHS through Asylum Seeker Re-estimates and Efficiencies (DHS)
  • $600,000 in FY25 for the Arches Re-Estimate, a mentorship program for young people (DOP)
  • $1.3 million in FY25 and outyears to eliminate the Behavioral Health Unit at the Department of Probation (DOP)
  • $700,000 in FY25 and outyears for cancellation of the Impact Program, a program for adolescents who are primarily sentenced to probation through Adult Criminal Court (DOP)
  • $98.9 million in FY25 at HPD for Asylum Seeker Re-estimates and Efficiencies (HPD)
  • $1.0 billion in FY 25 at H+H for Asylum Seeker Re-estimates and Efficiencies (H+H)
  • $3 million in FY26 and outyears for Re-Entry Services (OCJ)

The Preliminary Budget for FY 2025 Adds or Restores Funding for the Following Initiatives:

  • $265 million in FY25, $334 million in FY26, $431 million in FY27, and $536 million in FY28 for Pupil Transportation (DOE)
  • $80 million in FY25 for Summer Rising (DOE)
  • Restoration of $10 million in FY24 for Community Schools (DOE)
  • Restoration of $24.89 million in FY25, $25.5 million in FY26, $25.8 million in FY27, and $25.6 million in FY28 for Parks Job Training Program (DSS)
  • Restoration of $3.87 million in FY25 and $4.07 million in outyears for Job Training Participant (JTP) Street Cleaning Program (DSS)
  • Restoration of $5.47 million in FY25, $5.65 million in FY26, $5.82 million in FY27, and $9.28 million in FY28 for Litter Basket Services (Sanitation)

The Preliminary Budget for FY25 Fails to Fund Key Initiatives that Were Funded in the FY24 Adopted Budget

Investments that the City Administration funded in the FY24 Adopted Budget for one year only and are not funded in the FY25 Preliminary Budget.

  • $5.0 million in FY24 for the Mental Health Continuum (H+H, DOH, DOE)
  • $16 million in FY24 for PromiseNYC, which provides child care services to undocumented children and families (ACS)
  • $20 million in FY24 to hold schools harmless from federal funding lapses (DOE)
  • $4 million in FY24 for Immigrant Family Engagement in schools (DOE)
  • $14 million in FY24 for Community Schools (DOE)
  • $1.56 million in FY24 for Youth Homelessness (represents a $1.4 million reduction over FY23) (DYCD)
  • $5.5 million in FY24 for SYEP Metro cards (represents a $5.5 million reduction over FY23) (DYCD)
  • $5.2 million in FY24 for Groceries to Go (DOHMH)

The Preliminary Budget for FY 2025 Does Not Fund City Council’s FY 2024 Initiatives

These are restorations and investments that were funded by the City Council in FY24 only.

Community Development

  • $5.06 million for Asian-American Pacific Islander Community Support (an increase in $60,000 from FY23)
  • $3.7 million for Communities of Color Nonprofit Stabilization Fund
  • $4.59 million for Digital Inclusion and Literacy Initiative
  • $4.405 million for LGBT Community Services (a reduction of $819,375 from FY23)
  • $3.225 million for Trans Equity Programs (a reduction of $50,000 from FY23)

Community Safety and Victim Services

  • $5.1 million for Community Safety and Victim Services Initiative

Criminal Justice Services/Juvenile Justice

  • $14.487 million for Alternatives to Incarceration programs
  • $350,000 for Discharge Planning (an increase of 100,000 from FY23)
  • $2.525 million for Diversion Programs
  • $4.61 million for the Initiative to Combat Sexual Assault (a reduction of $50,000 from FY23)
  • $2.638 million for Innovative Criminal Justice Programs
  • $1.02 million for Support for Victims of Human Trafficking (a reduction of $177,935 from FY23)
  • $3.476 million for Support for Persons Involved in the Sex Trade (a reduction of $958,000 in FY23)

Domestic Violence

  • $12.01 million for Domestic Violence and Empowerment (DoVE) Initiative (an increase of $510,000 from FY23)
  • $2.45 million for Supportive Alternatives to Violent Encounters (SAVE), which includes $600,000 for Project CONNECT at ACS. 

Early Childhood Education

  • $5.45 million for the City’s First Readers Initiative
  • $600,000 for CUNY Child Care Expansion

Education

  • $1.74 million for College and Career Readiness
  • $3.75 million for Community Schools.
  • $7.14 million for Educational Programs for Students, which includes programs such as Chess in the Schools, and the Middle School Quality Initiative (distributed between DOE and DYCD)
  • $5 million for the Education Equity Action Plan to support the creation of a K-12 Black Studies curriculum ($5 million decrease from FY23)
  • $500,000 for the Jill Chaifetz Helpline operated by Advocates for Children.
  • $2.8 million for LGBTQ Inclusive Curriculum.
  • $925,000 million for Physical Education and Fitness ($250,000 decrease from FY23)
  • $2 million for Social and Emotional Supports for Students, including $777,000 for the Child Mind Institute (100,000 increase from FY23)
  • $4.4 million for Support for Educators, which funds professional development, training, and mentorship for teachers.
  • $4 million for Support for Arts Instruction ($1 million increase from FY23)
  • $7.4 million for Cultural Immigrant Initiative (distributed among DCLA, DYCD, CUNY, DOE)
  • $4.6 million for Digital Inclusion and Literacy Initiative (distributed among DYCD, DCLA, DFTA, DOE, and QBPL)
  • $714,500 for Work-Based Learning Internships

Environmental Initiatives

  • $5.1 million for A Greener NYC
  • $14.3 million for NYC Cleanup

Economic Security

  • $2.8 million for the Anti-Poverty Initiative

Food Initiatives

  • $7.26 million in FY24 for food pantries ($370,203 reduction over FY23)
  • $2.134 million for Access to Healthy Food and Nutritional Education, which funds farmers markets, urban farms, community gardens, and programs to expand the use of SNAP benefits
  • $1.5 million for the Food Access and Benefits Initiative (HRA)

Health Services

  • $3.620 million for Access Health NYC ($78,969 reduction over FY23)
  • $664,719 for Child Health and Wellness, which includes programs such as obesity prevention, asthma programs and oral health services
  • $3.728 million for the Maternal and Child Health Services initiative
  • $953,787 for the Managed Care Consumer Assistance Program ($60,327 reduction over FY23)
  • $554,423 for Reproductive and Sexual Health Services

Homeless and Housing Services

  • $1.35 million for Children and Families in the NYC Homeless System
  • $820,000 for the Citywide Homeless Prevention Fund
  • $3.65 million for Community Housing Preservation Strategies
  • $1.5 million for the Community Land Trust
  • $450,000 for Financial Empowerment for NYC’s Renters
  • $4.15 million for the Foreclosure Prevention Program ($100,00 reduction over FY23)
  • $1.8 million for the Home Loan Program ($200,000 reduction over FY23)
  • $650,000 for Housing Court Answers
  • $300,000 for the Housing Information Project
  • $3.75 million for Stabilizing NYC, a citywide coalition to prevent the loss of affordable housing ($50,000 reduction over FY23)

Immigrant Services

  • $16.6 million for the New York Immigrant Family Unity Project ($750,000 reduction from FY23)
  • $3.982 million for the Unaccompanied Minors and Families Initiative
  • $2.4 million for Immigrant Health Initiative
  • $2.6 million for Immigrant Opportunities Initiative
  • $700,000 for Key to the City ($700,000 increase over FY23) 

Legal Services

  • $3.0 million for Family Advocacy and Guardianship Support
  • $485,000 for Legal Information for Families Today (LIFT)
  • $5.8 million for Legal Services for Low-income New Yorkers, which includes citywide legal services and the SSI advocacy project
  • $3.455 million for Legal Services for the Working Poor ($25,000 increase over FY23)

Mental Health Services

  • $3.26 million for the Autism Awareness Initiative ($55,000 reduction from FY23)
  • $1.56 million for the Children Under 5 Initiative, which funds community-based mental health services for children under 5 ($231,000 reduction from FY23) $3.425 million for the Court-Involved Youth Mental Health Initiative
  • $2.23 million for Developmental, Psychological and Behavioral Health Services ($30,000 reduction from FY23)
  • $1.2 million for the LGBTQ Youth All-Borough Mental Health Initiative
  • $3.66 million for Mental Health Services for Vulnerable Populations, which included the Samaritans Suicide Prevention hotline ($270,000 reduction from FY23)
  • $3.08 million for Opioid Prevention and Treatment ($425,000 reduction from FY23)

Parks and Recreation

  • $5.4 million for Parks Equity Initiative ($255,000 increase above FY23)

Public Safety

  • $720,000 for Arts as a Catalyst for Change
  • $3.77 million for the Crisis Management System (distributed among DOE, DOP, DYCD, and HHC) (a reduction of $155,000 from FY23)
  • $125,000 for Cure Hate
  • $1.225 million for the Hate Crimes Prevention Initiative (an increase of $225,000 from FY23)

Young Women’s Initiative

  • $973,126 for a Dedicated Contraceptive Fund
  • $250,000 for HRA Teen RAPP Enhancement.
  • $530,000 for an Initiative for Immigrant Survivors of Domestic Violence.
  • $350,000 for the Prevent Sexual Assault (PSA) Initiative for Young Adults.
  • $174,000 for Step in and Stop it Initiative to Address Bystander Intervention.
  • $714,500 for Work-Based Learning Internships.
  • $1.096 million for Wrap-Around Supports for Transitional-Aged Foster Youth (a reduction of $133,212 from FY23)
  • $1.74 million for Young Women’s Leadership Development (a reduction of $65,000 from FY23)

Youth Services

  • $8.2 million for the Afterschool Enrichment Initiative (a reduction of $65,000 from FY23)
  • $1.2 million for Big Brothers and Big Sister of New York City.
  • $500,000 for Civic Education in New York City Schools
  • $1.87 million for COMPASS elementary after-school programs.
  • $1.472 million for Sports Training and Role Models for Success Initiative (STARS).
  • $1.75 million for Youth Build Project Initiative (a reduction of $350,000 from FY23)
  • $17.34 million for Cultural After-School Adventure (CASA).
  • $1 million for Citywide Young Adult Entrepreneurship Program Initiative.

 Community Development

  • $5.06 million for Asian-American Pacific Islander Community Support ($60,000 increase above FY23)

Community stabilization

  • $3.7 million for Communities of Color Nonprofit Stabilization Fund

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